What Is An Inplant Building?

What Is An Inplant Building?

The new trend in industrial and commercial building is inplant buildings. While this may seem like just another trend, there are many reasons why an inplant building might be useful in your factory or industrial application. What are inplant buildings, and what are their benefits? 

What is an inplant building?

Inplant are essentially a building inside of a building, specifically, a factory plant. It’s not just a room, though. An inplant building is more like a suite of rooms or a building itself, with freestanding walls, it’s own ceiling, etc., though it may incorporate some of the factory’s existing structures.

Inplant buildings can serve a lot of purposes, from creating office spaces to separating process flows and more. These inplant buildings are constructed modularly, which has a lot of benefits in terms of build time and cost.

What are the benefits of inplant buildings?

Some of the uses of inplant buildings are obvious: say you need some offices. You don’t want to set up desks and cubicles on the factory floor, next to your inspection area or where the forklifts are parked. An inplant building can solve this dilemma. If you have equipment that is loud and requires hearing protection, you can create an equipment enclosure to contain it and reduce noise to surrounding outside areas. 

One benefit to inplant buildings is their modular construction. Modular construction can be less expensive than traditional construction. Additionally, it is quicker to assemble modularly constructed buildings, which saves you time and lost production time, which saves you even more money. Plus, modular construction depreciates faster than traditional construction, an added tax benefit. 

Another benefit to modularly constructed inplant buildings is their flexibility. If you need a temporary office space for example, an inplant building can serve that purpose and be quickly and easily taken down when no longer needed. In fact, the modular components can all be reused for a new application. If you need to add onto a modular building, or change the layout in some way, modular construction offers that flexibility, since you can add new modules and reuse existing ones in new formations.

Because of their easy of assembly, you can even construct or modify your inplant buildings with your own personnel—no subcontractors required.

 

If you’re looking to create an inplant building, contact the design engineers at Angstrom Technology to see how modular construction can work for your situation, and be sure to check out our guide to Modular Offices and Inplant Buildings.

Cleanroom Terminology: Airlocks

Cleanroom Terminology: Airlocks

When first starting the cleanroom design process, a lot of people are confused or intimidated by the new vocabulary, which can be complicated. Suddenly you have to understand classifications and all sorts of design features and figure out which of these are right for your application. Here’s a breakdown of one of the common terms you’ll hear in cleanroom design: airlocks.

What are airlocks?

An airlock is a system of two doors that are electronically interlocked so that both cannot be open at the same time. This can prevent contamination and prevent particles from outside the cleanroom from entering the cleanroom when personnel enter or exit the cleanroom. An airlock system will also help maintain the controlled temperature of a cleanroom space. Airlocks can also be used as security features to prevent unauthorized access to a space.

What kinds of airlocks are there?

There are secure and non-secure airlocks. In a secure airlock system, all doors remain locked until a request to enter is granted. This generally occurs through some kind of request to enter device, like a button or keypad. A non-secure airlock means that the doors remain unlocked until the first door is opened; then, the other doors lock.

You also have the option of making your airlocks supervised or unsupervised. For high-security areas, you may choose to have a supervised airlock, where personnel must press a request to access button and that request must be approved via a CCTV or viewing panel verification system. An unsupervised cleanroom could control access through a biometric reader or keypad to gain access. Such systems are useful where only authorized personnel may enter the cleanroom environment. 

Other considerations

Depending on the classification and application of your cleanroom, you might want additional security features in place on your airlock. Some of these include breach alarms, which alert you to when the airlock has been breached and contamination may have occurred, alarms for when a door has been open for too long, and door status indicators. These features can ensure that airlocks serve their purpose and limit outside contamination entering the controlled environment.

 

If your cleanroom requires an airlock, Angstrom Technology can design a cleanroom that will fit the bill. Talk to one of our design engineers today.