Press Release: Angstrom’s New Facility

Press Release: Angstrom’s New Facility

Angstrom Technology is pleased to announce that our new facility has finally been completed. The building is located at 3509 3 Mile Road in Grand Rapids, alongside DK Engineered Construction. The new facility is 20,000 square feet and houses our cleanroom, modular office design and build firm, as well as our corporate office. We look forward to settling in to our recently completed and freshly landscaped new home!

Our employees are Angstrom Technology’s greatest attribute, and the quality of our people and their work is unsurpassed in the industry. That’s just one of the reasons we’re so proud to have built a new facility giving our valuable employees a place to call home!

Angstrom Technologies main office is located here in West Michigan, with satellite sales offices in Ohio, Pennsylvania and California.

As an industry leader in cleanroom production, Angstrom Technology’s mission is to be a top resource for cleanroom consulting, design, installation, equipment, and repair. With extensive knowledge of cleanrooms and the industries they serve, Angstrom ensures that our clients get exactly the cleanroom they need for their project.

Come visit us at our new facility and see just what we do, and how our modular cleanroom solutions can work for you. Call or contact us online to get a quote or set up an initial consultation, at our place or yours!

Most Common Cleanroom Design Problems

Most Common Cleanroom Design Problems

Cleanrooms present a lot of unique challenges in terms of design because they have very specific requirements they have to meet. If you’re meeting your desired ISO standard, you might feel like your design is good enough, but the truth is that there are a lot of common issues that companies face when designing cleanrooms. Here are some of the most common cleanroom design problems we see:

Inefficient placement

One of the biggest issues with cleanroom design is inefficiency. If your design doesn’t support your processes, it’s going to cause problems. Consider the various tasks and processes that go on in your cleanroom. Is someone always getting in someone else’s way because of where there workstations or supplies are located? Are there too many processes sharing one sink, causing a bottleneck? Are there drawers or cabinets that you can’t fully open because they’re too close to a wall or door? All of those problems can cause major inefficiency and can be avoided with good design.

Maze-like walkways

The whole point of a maze is inefficiency, it takes a long time to get through a relatively short distance because you have to twist and turn and wind around obstacles. But your cleanroom shouldn’t be a labyrinth. If employees have to walk through narrow paths, wind around oddly placed workstations, or bump into each other constantly to get to the door, their workstations, the sink, or the fire extinguisher, you will have massive safety problems on your hands, not to mention a lot of wasted time and motion on the part of the cleanroom techs.

Poor ventilation

Good ventilation is necessary for any space to be comfortable, but it’s especially crucial in a cleanroom, where you’re trying to maintain a controlled environment with limited particles and contaminants. Additionally, in cleanrooms where hazardous materials are used, good ventilation is a necessary safety concern to ensure the well-being of workers.

Unable to maintain temperature

No one wants to work in a room that’s too hot and stuffy or freezing cold, so for the same of employees comfort and morale, a cleanroom that is a comfortable temperature matters. It’s vital too that your cleanroom can maintain its desired temperature to protect the products, materials, and chemicals stored in it, as they can be sensitive to temperature, and to prevent the growth of mold and bacteria that can compromise the cleanroom environment. This could be a problem with your HVAC, thermostat, or insulation, so be sure to select those things wisely and perform regular maintenance checks.

Good design is the first step to having a well-functioning cleanroom. If you recognize some of the issues we mentioned in your current cleanroom, it’s probably time for a redesign. There are a few things you can do in the meantime to work with the layout you have and increase efficiency, such as rearranging movable cleanroom furniture, moving processes that don’t require a controlled environment to a new area, or simply cleaning out any tools, materials, or storage that is no longer necessary.

Having issues with your cleanroom design? Call the experts at Angstrom Technology.

 

How are Cleanrooms Validated?

How are Cleanrooms Validated?

Validation is an important process for any cleanroom. It serves to ensure that the cleanroom is properly designed for its intended ISO classification and that all of the components (facility, environment, equipment) meet regulatory requirements and other defined standards. So what’s the cleanroom validation process?

Most often, cleanrooms are validated by third-party validation agencies. This entails a thorough inspection and several tests, whereafter the cleanroom is certified to a specific class indicating its level of control, usually to an ISO14544-1 class.

Validation has several phases, beginning with design qualification, and ending in final certification.  Some of the tests performed in these phases include airflow volume and velocity tests, HEPA/ULPA filter leak testing, air movement visualization (smoke testing), room pressurization, room recovery, airborne particle count tests, relative humidity, temperature, and other testing conditions.

Certification consists of three main phases. Installation qualification is also referred to as Phase 1 or “As built” testing. Testing is performed with all services connected and working, but no materials, production equipment, or employees present, proving that the equipment is correctly installed

Phase 2 is the operational qualification or “At rest” testing. Testing occurs when equipment is installed but not operating, and no employees are present. This proves that the equipment works properly to achieve the required environmental conditions.

Phase 3 is what is referred to as performance qualification. In this phase, testing is performed with all equipment installed and operating and employees performing their regular work duties and tasks. This testing proves that the cleanroom has the required operational performance for the cleanroom application.

Once initial certification is complete, it is important to regularly recertify to ensure that your cleanroom continues to operate as it did when it was built.  At a minimum, annual certification is recommended. Depending on industry and product, semi-annual or even quarterly certification may be required.

Need a cleanroom to meet ISO or other standards? Angstrom Technology can design it and build it!